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Hidden Histories in Latin America Art: between art and the sky there is nothing hidden

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Graciela Sacco’s Enfrentados (serie Tensión Admisible) [Confronted (Admissible Tension Series)] has a fractured barrier and an air of resistance; it stands as the lone positive response to the struggle against injustice.  Photo: Maria BonillaPanorama Online

Graciela Sacco’s Enfrentados (serie Tensión Admisible) [Confronted (Admissible Tension Series)] has a fractured barrier and an air of resistance; it stands as the lone positive response to the struggle against injustice.
Photo: Maria BonillaPanorama Online

Phoenix, Arizona. July 10. In Spanish, there are two very old quotes  that say “between heaven and earth there is nothing hidden” and “that the sun can not cover with hands and the truth always comes to light”. These quotes portray what the artists are trying to say through their work displayed in the exhibition Hidden Histories in Latin American Art, at Phoenix Art Museum until August 23, 2015.

This exhibition features Latin American and Latino artists who investigate stories or histories marginalized by the media, historical events and present circumstances that we might rather forget, through which artists used everyday materials of urban life for his works, which express through collage disappearances of citizens by guerrillas, drug traffickers or the same governments of some countries or groups like the darkest periods persecution of immigrants in the southwestern United States, reflecting the feelings of the artists on these political moments of the history of Latinos both inside and outside the United States.

Hidden Histories includes works by Luis González Palma (Guatemala, born 1957), Annie Lopez (Arizona, USA 1958), Teresa Margolles (Mexico, 1963), Graciela Sacco (Argentina, 1956), Doris Salcedo (Colombia, 1958), and Vincent Valdez (US, 1977).

Hidden Histories in Latin American Art is on view at the Phoenix Art Museum through August 23, 2015. More information: Call 602-257-1880 or visit www.phxart.org

 

Annie Lopez, history in a dress / Phoenix-based artist Annie Lopez is a fourth-generation Mexican American who incorporates her personal history into works that echo the sentiments of discrimination that underpin the exhibition.  Naturalized Citizens (2013) uses her family’s naturalization papers to create a cyanotype paper dress that alludes to the need to display one’s citizenship when it is so often called into question just by outward appearance. Photo:Maria Bonilla/Panorama Online

Annie Lopez, history in a dress / Phoenix-based artist Annie Lopez is a fourth-generation Mexican American who incorporates her personal history into works that echo the sentiments of discrimination that underpin the exhibition. Naturalized Citizens (2013) uses her family’s naturalization papers to create a cyanotype paper dress that alludes to the need to display one’s citizenship when it is so often called into question just by outward appearance.
Photo:Maria Bonilla/Panorama Online

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